Perception of repeated /l/ and /n/: Implications for understanding dissimilation

Nancy Hall, Bianca Godinez, Megan Walsh, Sarah Garcia, Araceli Carmona

Abstract


We test Ohala’s (1993) hypothesis that phonological dissimilation can result from perceptual errors. Using a task in which American English speakers hear and orthographically transcribe nonce words, we test whether they are more likely to omit an acoustically present /l/ or /n/ when heard in a word where another token of the same sound is present. We find that this is the case for /l/ but not for /n/. These results mirror the actual prevalence of dissimilation in American English, where /l/-dissimilation occurs occasionally, but /n/-dissimilation rarely or never.

Keywords


dissimilation; hypercorrection; speech perception; nasals; laterals

Full Text:

PDF


DOI: https://doi.org/10.3765/plsa.v5i1.4737

Copyright (c) 2020 Nancy Hall, Bianca Godinez, Megan Walsh, Sarah Garcia, Araceli Carmona

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

Donate to the Open-Access Fund of the LSA

Linguistic Society of America


Advancing the Scientific Study of Language since 1924

ISSN (online): 2473-8689

This publication is made available for free to readers and with no charge to authors thanks in part to your continuing LSA membership and your donations to the open access fund.